NIEUW: Blog reclamevrij maken?

Logo

Stille Pagina

Beste bezoeker,

Wil je een videoclip bekijken en stoort het X-files-deuntje jou daarbij. Schakel het  deuntje gewoon uit door in deze kolon, helemaal beneden op de 2 witte balkjes in het blauwe cirkeltje te klikken, tot een pijltje verschijnt. Veel kijk- en luisterplezier en bedankt voor jouw bezoek.

Inhoud blog
  • Radio silence from star with seven Earth-sized rocky planets
  • Will NASA’s New Discovery Be the Key to Finding Extraterrestrial Life?
  • Thomas Pesquet's selfie from space answers conspiracy theorists; here are a few mesmerising photos that the French astronaut tweeted from ISS [PHOTOS]
  • Filipijnen in de ban van enorme aangespoelde ‘zeemonsters’
  • Filipijnen in de ban van enorme aangespoelde ‘zeemonsters’
  • Filipijnen in de ban van enorme aangespoelde ‘zeemonsters’
  • VOORBEREIDINGEN ALIEN INVASIE IN VOLLE GANG ( VIDEO )
  • 40 Foot Hairy Sea Creature Found On Coastal Shores Of Philippines, Video, UFO Sighting News.
  • 25,000 Year Old Bosnian Pyramids, Scientist Has found Tesla’s ‘TORSION FIELDS’ at the Bosnian Pyramids! UFO Sighting News.
  • Giant UFO Caught Over Indonesia Highway On Feb 7, 2017, Video, UFO Sighting News.
  • Travis Walton Says "Aliens Accidentally Killed me but Took my Corpse onto UFO to Save my Life." Video, UFO Sighting News.
  • Newly discovered solar system off the Gerrymeter charts
  • Americans Are 300× More Likely to Report UFO Sightings Than the Rest of the World
  • Americans Are 300× More Likely to Report UFO Sightings Than the Rest of the World
  • Americans Are 300× More Likely to Report UFO Sightings Than the Rest of the World
  • North Carolina witness unsure: UFO or drone? (VIDEO)
  • A Guide to Oregon’s Extraterrestrial Past and Present!
  • Visit TRAPPIST-1e! NASA Travel Poster Advertises Exoplanet Discovery
  • WATCH: UFO hunter vows to find 'alien base entrance' in hill where he films every night
  • UFOs filmed forming bizarre ‘triangle formation’ over remote farm
    Categorieën
  • 7tales ( E ) (425)
  • ALIEN LIFE ( FR. , NL; E ) (20)
  • André's Hoekje (ENG) (728)
  • André's Snelkoppelingen (ENG) (378)
  • ARTICLES of MUFON ( ENG) (115)
  • Artikels (NL.) (139)
  • ASTRONOMIE / RUIMTEVAART (2498)
  • Before it's news (ENG.) (5602)
  • Diversen (Eng, NL en Fr) (990)
  • FILER FILES - overzicht met foto's met dank aan Georges Filer en WWW.nationalUFOCenter.com (ENG) (540)
  • Frederick's NEWS ITEMS (ENG en NL) (109)
  • HLN.be - Het Laatste Nieuws ( NL) (542)
  • INGRID's WEETJES (NL) (2)
  • Kathleen Marden 's News about Abductions... ( ENG) (26)
  • LATEST UFO-NEWS ( ENG) (3517)
  • Michel GRANGER - a French researcher ( Fr) (10)
  • National UFO Center {NUFOC} (103)
  • News from the FRIENDS of facebook ( ENG ) (5564)
  • NIEUWS VAN JAN ( NL) (36)
  • Nieuws van Paul ( NL) (11)
  • NineForNews. nl ( new ipv NIBURU.nl) (NL) (2192)
  • Oliver's WebLog ( ENG en NL) (116)
  • Paul SCHROEDER ( ENG) (98)
  • Reseau Francophone MUFON / EUROPE ( FR) (77)
  • références - MAGONIE (Fr) (436)
  • SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL ) (104)
  • UFO DIGEST / a Weekly Newsletter - thanks that I may publish this on my blog (ENG) (123)
  • Vincent'snieuws ( ENG en NL) (5)
  • Who is Stanton FRIEDMAN - follow his news (ENG) (15)
  • WHO IS WHO? ( ENG en NL) (5)
  • Zoeken in blog

    Beoordeel dit blog
      Zeer goed
      Goed
      Voldoende
      Nog wat bijwerken
      Nog veel werk aan
     
    The purpose of  this blog is the creation of an open, international, independent and  free forum, where every UFO-researcher can publish the results of his/her research. The languagues, used for this blog, are Dutch, English and French.You can find the articles of a collegue by selecting his category.
    Each author stays resposable for the continue of his articles. As blogmaster I have the right to refuse an addition or an article, when it attacks other collegues or UFO-groupes.
     
    Archief per maand
  • 02-2017
  • 01-2017
  • 12-2016
  • 11-2016
  • 10-2016
  • 09-2016
  • 08-2016
  • 07-2016
  • 06-2016
  • 05-2016
  • 04-2016
  • 03-2016
  • 02-2016
  • 01-2016
  • 12-2015
  • 11-2015
  • 10-2015
  • 09-2015
  • 08-2015
  • 07-2015
  • 06-2015
  • 05-2015
  • 04-2015
  • 03-2015
  • 02-2015
  • 01-2015
  • 12-2014
  • 11-2014
  • 10-2014
  • 09-2014
  • 08-2014
  • 07-2014
  • 06-2014
  • 05-2014
  • 04-2014
  • 03-2014
  • 02-2014
  • 01-2014
  • 12-2013
  • 11-2013
  • 10-2013
  • 09-2013
  • 08-2013
  • 07-2013
  • 06-2013
  • 05-2013
  • 04-2013
  • 03-2013
  • 02-2013
  • 01-2013
  • 12-2012
  • 11-2012
  • 10-2012
  • 09-2012
  • 08-2012
  • 07-2012
  • 06-2012
  • 05-2012
  • 04-2012
  • 03-2012
  • 02-2012
  • 01-2012
  • 12-2011
  • 11-2011
  • 10-2011
  • 09-2011
  • 08-2011
  • 07-2011
  • 06-2011
    Rondvraag / Poll
    Bestaan UFO's echt? Are UFOs real?Les OVNIS existent-ils vraiement?
    Ja / Yes / Oui
    Nee / NO / Non
    Bekijk resultaat

    Rondvraag / Poll
    Denk Jij dat UFO's buitenaards zijn? Do You think that UFOs are extraterrestrial? Les OVNIS sont- ils ET?
    ja / Yes / Oui
    Nee / NO / NON
    Bekijk resultaat

    E-mail mij

    Druk oponderstaande knop om mij te e-mailen.

    Blog als favoriet !
    FORUM

    Druk op onderstaande knop om te reageren in mijn forum

    Zoeken in blog

    ">

    UFO'S - MET HET LAATSTE NIEUWS OVER UFO'S BOVEN BELGIË EN IN ANDERE LANDEN...
    UFO's in België en de rest van de wereld
    In België heb je vooral BUFON of het Belgisch UFO-Netwerk, dat zich met UFO's bezighoudt. BEZOEK DUS ZEKER VOOR ALLE OBJECTIEVE INFORMATIE ww.ufo.be. Verder heb je ook het Belgisch-Ufo-meldpunt en Caelestia, die prachtig, doch ZEER kritisch werk leveren, ja soms zelfs héél sceptisch... Voor Nederland kan je de mooie site www.ufowijzer.nl bezoeken van Paul Harmans. Een mooie site met veel informatie en artikels. MUFON of het Mutual UFO Network Inc is een Amerikaanse UFO-vereniging met afdelingen in alle USA-staten en diverse landen. MUFON's mission is the analytical and scientific investigation of the UFO- Phenomenon for the benefit of humanity... Je kan ook hun site bekijken onder www.mufon.com. Ze geven een maandeliiks tijdschrift uit, namelijk The MUFON UFO-Journal. Since 02/01/2013 is Pieter not only president (=voorzitter) of BUFON, but also National Director MUFON / Flanders and the Netherlands. We work together with the French MUFON Reseau MUFON/EUROP.
    23-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Straight Out of Sci-Fi: Hoverbike 'Surfs' Through the Air in Test

    Straight Out of Sci-Fi: Hoverbike 'Surfs' Through the Air in Test

    The hoverbike prototype, dubbed Scorpion-3, is capable of lifting itself and a driver into the air.
    Credit: Hoversurf/YouTube

    Think of it as half drone, half motorcycle: A new hoverbike prototype aims to make flying as simple as riding a bike.

    Hoversurf, a Russian drone startup, recently unveiled its Scorpion-3 hoverbike in a test- flight video — making it the first manned quadcopter that has undergone testing, reported Futurism, a science and technology news website.

    The Scorpion-3 combines quadcopter-drone technology with a traditional motorcycle design, resulting in an electric-powered hoverbike that can lift itself and a pilot into the air. According to Hoversurf's website, the hoverbike can be flown by both professionals and amateurs, because the bike's custom software allows for both manual and automated control. [Hyperloop, Jetpacks & More: 9 Futuristic Transit Ideas]

    "[The] Scorpion platform is the next step in accessible amateur flying developed to inspire athletes, engineers, scientists and inventors around the world," Hoversurf officials said on the company's website. "[It] is equipped with a safety system powered by state of the art flight controllers, special logical programing and passive elements with computer aided speed and altitude limiting."

    While the Scorpion-3 could offer new mass transportation options, like Dubai's recently announced passenger drone, Hoversurf said it designed the hoverbike with extreme sports in mind. A compact dirt bike inspired the hoverbike's sport-utility frame, and the pilot's uniform (seen in the video and on the website) is reminiscent of a motocross driver. The company describes the hoverbike's ride as "surfing through the air."  

    Scorpion-3 is not the only hoverbike to take to the skies. Beyond the autonomous "taxi drone" that is scheduled to launch in Dubai, there are both private and public prototypes of similar high-tech modes of transportation in the works. According to Futurism, the U.S. military partnered with Malloy Aeronautics to build a hoverbike that could help soldiers in the field.

    Aerofex, a California-based aerospace engineering company, is also developing a passenger drone. The company's so-called Aero-X is described as "a hovercraft that rides like a motorcycle," Live Science has reported, and can fly at 45 mph (72 km/h) up to 10 feet (3 meters) off the ground.

    Original article on Live Science.

    http://www.livescience.com/ }

    23-02-2017 om 17:05 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    13-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Future Robots May be Considered “Electronic Persons”

    Future Robots May be Considered “Electronic Persons”

     iStock/iLexx
    IN BRIEF
    • Few government bodies are considering how we will categorize machines with advanced artificial intelligence.
    • Some have proposed creating a separate category known as "electronic persons" as a basis for deciding questions of legal standing.

    Science fiction likes to depict robots as autonomous machines, capable of making their own decisions and often expressing their own personalities. Yet we also tend to think of robots as property, and as lacking the kind of rights that we reserve for people.

    humanoidrobot_home-600x600
    CLICK TO VIEW THE FULL INFOGRAPHIC

    But if a machine can think, decide and act on its own volition, if it can be harmed or held responsible for its actions, should we stop treating it like property and start treating it more like a person with rights?

    What if a robot achieves true self-awareness? Should it have equal rights with us and the same protection under the law, or at least something similar?

    These are some of the issues being discussed by the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs. Last year it released a draft report and motion calling for a set of civil law rules on robotics regulating their manufacture, use, autonomy and impact upon society.

    Of the legal solutions proposed, perhaps most interesting was the suggestion of creating a legal status of “electronic persons” for the most sophisticated robots.

    APPROACHING PERSONHOOD

    The report acknowledged that improvements in the autonomous and cognitive abilities of robots makes them more than simple tools, and makes ordinary rules on liability, such as contractual and tort liability, insufficient for handling them.

    For example, the current EU directive on liability for harm by robots only covers foreseeable damage caused by manufacturing defects. In these cases, the manufacturer is responsible. However, when robots are able to learn and adapt to their environment in unpredictable ways, it’s harder for a manufacturer to foresee problems that could cause harm.

    The report also questions about whether or not sufficiently sophisticated robots should be regarded as natural persons, legal persons (like corporations), animals or objects. Rather than lumping them into an existing category, it proposes that a new category of “electronic person” is more appropriate.

    The report does not advocate immediate legislative action, though. Instead, it proposes that legislation be updated if robots become more complex; if and when they develop more behavioral sophistication. If this occurs, one recommendation is to reduce the liability of “creators” proportional to the autonomy of the robot, and that a compulsory “no-fault” liability insurance could cover the shortfall.

    But why go so far as to create a new category of “electronic persons”? After all, computers still have a long way to go before they match human intelligence if they ever do.

    But it can be agreed that robots – or more precisely the software that controls them – is becoming increasingly complex. Autonomous (or “emergent”) machines are becoming more common. There are ongoing discussions about the legal liability for autonomous vehicles, or whether we might be able to sue robotic surgeons.

    These are not complicated problems as long as liability rests with the manufacturers. But what if manufacturers cannot be easily identified, such as if open source software is used by autonomous vehicles? Whom do you sue when there are millions of “creators” all over the world?

    Artificial intelligence is also starting to live up to its moniker. Alan Turing, the father of modern computing, proposed a test in which a computer is considered “intelligent” if it fools humans into believing that the computer is human by its responses to questions. Already there are machines that are getting close to passing this test.

    There are also other incredible successes, such as the computer that creates soundtracks to videos that are indistinguishable from natural sounds, the robot that can beat CAPTCHA, one that can create handwriting indistinguishable from human handwriting and the AI that recently beat some of the world’s best poker players.

    Robots may eventually match human cognitive abilities, and they are becoming increasingly human-like, including the ability to “feel” pain.

    If this progress continues, it may not be long before self-aware robots are not just a product of fantastic speculation.

    The EU report is among the first to formally consider these issues, but other countries are also engaging. Peking University’s Yueh-Hsuan Weng writes that Japan and South Korea expect us to live in a human-robot coexistence by 2030. Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry has created a series of robot guidelines addressing business and safety issues for next generation robots.

    ELECTRONIC PERSONS

    If we did give robots some kind of legal status, what would it be? If they behaved like humans, we could treat them like legal subjects rather than legal objects, or at least something in between. Legal subjects have rights and duties, and this gives them legal “personhood”. They do not have to be physical persons; a corporation is not a physical person but is recognized as a legal subject. Legal objects, on the other hand, do not have rights or duties although they may have economic value.

    Assigning rights and duties to an inanimate object or software program independent of their creators may seem strange. However, with corporations, we already see extensive rights and obligations given to fictitious legal entities.

    Perhaps the approach to robots could be similar to that of corporations? The robot (or software program), if sufficiently sophisticated or if satisfying certain requirements, could be given similar rights to a corporation. This would allow it to earn money, pay taxes, own assets and sue or be sued independently of its creators. Its creators could, like directors of corporations, have rights or duties to the robot and to others with whom the robot interacts.

    Robots would still have to be partly treated as legal objects since, unlike corporations, they may have physical bodies. The “electronic person” could thus be a combination of both a legal subject and a legal object.

    The European Parliament will vote on the resolution this month. Regardless of the result, reconsidering robots and the law is inevitable and will require complex legal, computer science, and insurance research.

     Read more articles from The Conversation

    13-02-2017 om 23:07 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    12-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Robo-Bees Could Aid Insects with Pollination Duties

    Robo-Bees Could Aid Insects with Pollination Duties

    Robo-Bees Could Aid Insects with Pollination Duties
    illustration shows a tiny drone equipped with horsehair and coated with a gel that could be used to pollinate flowers.
    Credit: Eijiro Miyako

    Mini drones sporting horsehair coated in a sticky gel could one day take the pressure off beleaguered bee populations by transporting pollen from plant to plant, researchers said.

    Roughly three-quarters of the world’s flowering plants and about 35 percent of the world's food crops depend on animals to pollinate them, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    Some of nature's most prolific pollinators are bees, but bee populations are declining around the world, and last month, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed a native species as endangered for the first time. [No Creepy Crawlies Here: Gallery of the Cutest Bugs]

    Now, researchers from Japan said they've taken the first steps toward creating robots that could help pick up the slack from insect pollinators. The scientists created a sticky gel that lets a $100 matchbox-size drone pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it onto another to help the plants reproduce.

    "This is a proof of concept — there's nothing compared to this. It's a totally first-time demonstration," said study leader Eijiro Miyako, a chemist at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science in Tsukuba, Japan. "Some robots are expected to be used for experiments in pollination, but no one has tried yet."

    The key innovation of the new study, published today (Feb. 9) in the journal Chem, is the so-called ionic liquid gel, but according to Miyako it was more down to luck than design. The gel was actually the result of a failed attempt to create electrically conducting liquids and had sat forgotten in a desk drawer for nearly a decade.

    But after eight years, it still hadn't dried out, which most other gels would have done, and was still very sticky, Miyako said. Fortunately, this discovery coincided with Miyako watching a documentary that detailed concerns about insect pollinators.

     "I actually dropped the gel on the floor and I noticed it absorbed a lot of dust, and everything linked together in my mind," he told Live Science.

    The gel has just the right stickiness, meaning it can pick up pollen but is not so adhesive that it won't let the grains go.

    The scientists next tested how effectively the gel could be used to transport pollen among flowers. To do so, the researchers put droplets of the material on the back of ants and left the insects overnight in a box full of tulips. The next day, the scientists found that the ants with the gel had picked up far more pollen grains than those insects that lacked the sticky substance.

    In a side experiment, the researchers found that it was possible to integrate photochromic compounds, which change color when exposed to UV or white light, into the gel. Scientists stuck this material onto living flies, giving the bugs color-changing capabilities. This, Miyako said, could ultimately act as some kind of adaptive camouflage to protect pollinators from predators.

    But while improving the ability of other insects to pollinate flowers is a potential solution to falling bee numbers, Miyako said he was not convinced, and so began to look elsewhere. "It's very difficult using living organisms for real practical realizations, so I decided to change my approach and use robots," he said.

    The hairs that make insects like bees fuzzy are important for their role as pollinators, because the hairs increase the surface area of the bees' bodies, giving pollen more material to stick to. In order to give the smooth, plastic drone similar capabilities, the scientists added a patch of horsehair to the robot's underside, which was then coated with the gel.

    The researchers then flew the drones to collect pollen from the flowers of Japanese lilies and transport this pollen to other flowers. In each experiment, the researchers made 100 attempts at pollinating the flower, achieving an overall success rate of 37 percent. Drones without the patch of hair, or with uncoated hair, failed to pollinate the plants.

    Miyako said there are currently limitations to the technology, because it is difficult to manually pilot the drone. However, he added that he thinks GPS and artificial intelligence could one day be used to automatically guide robotic pollinators.

    Before these robo-bees become a reality, though, the cost of the drone will have to come down drastically and it's 3-minute battery life will need to improve significantly, Miyako said. But he added that he is confident this will happen eventually.

    Dave Goulson, a professor at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom, said he sees the intellectual interest in trying to create robot bees, but he's skeptical  about how practical they are and worries about distracting from more vital pollinator conservation work.Goulson specializes in the conservation of bumblebees but was not involved with the new research.

    In a blog post, he wrote that there are roughly 3.2 trillion bees on the planet. Even if the robo-bees cost 1 cent per unit and lasted a year, which he said is a highly optimistic estimate, it would cost $32 billion a year to maintain the population and would litter the countryside with tiny robots.

    "Real bees avoid all of these issues; they are self-replicating, self-powering and essentially carbon-neutral," Goulson wrote in the post. "We have wonderfully efficient pollinators already. Let's look after them, not plan for their demise."  

    Original article on Live Science.

    12-02-2017 om 01:18 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    11-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.The Future Belongs to Flying Robots

    The Future Belongs to Flying Robots

     
    Dawn, Drone, Dusk, Mountains, Outdoors
    Adam Vilimek/Shutterstock
    IN BRIEF
    The University of California system’s Center of Excellence on Unmanned Aircraft System Safety is hard at work looking into the future of unmanned aircraft. The director sees a lot of potential in the technology for agriculture, environmental, and even social opportunities.

    The once-small community of drone hobbyists has transformed into a worldwide phenomenon. In 2016 especially, significant technology improvements and regulatory clarity have paved the way for even more dramatic changes in the coming years.

    Among the biggest adopters of drones, and experimenters with them, have been universities. As the director of the University of California system’s Center of Excellence on Unmanned Aircraft System Safety – effectively the drone headquarters of our whole 10-campus system – I have an excellent view of the drone industry’s past, present and future.

    The truly surprising details are about how wide and diverse a range of purposes drones are serving on our campuses – and what’s coming next. As we begin exploring what drones can do, and identifying what social and commercial uses they might serve, the work provides a glimpse into the future of drone flight across the country, and throughout our economy.

    ENGINEERING RESEARCH

    Drones have only recently reached the commercial mainstream. However, university engineering departments have been designing and building them for decades. For years, engineering students, for instance, have studied the advanced control algorithms that keep drones flying level and straight. Their work has helped bring us to the point where drones are even available for sale in toy stores.

    It is no surprise that our engineers are still working on drones and related technology such as sensors, automation and innovative platforms. Some introductory engineering classes involve students building and flying drones; more advanced students learn about flight dynamics and algorithms that help drones stay aloft.

    In recent years, though, our engineering departments are focusing less on building the aircraft and more on improving safety, navigation and ability to carry equipment that allows drones to help with different tasks.

    For example, researchers are developing navigation systems that don’t rely on GPS satellites. This could help allow drones to navigate autonomously inside buildings, in deep canyons, underground or other places where GPS signals are unavailable or unreliable. Whether delivering packages to remote locations or handling emergency tasks in hazardous conditions, this type of capability could significantly expand drones’ usefulness.

    Another research group is working on ways for drones to help detect gas leaks from oil pipelines. With millions of miles of pipelines across the country, that is a monumental task. Attaching methane-sniffing sensors to drones could make it much easier: Autonomous drones could fly the routes of every pipeline nearly constantly, registering the location and volume of leaks, and alerting repair and cleanup crews.

    Image credit: jon11/iStock
    Image credit: jon11/iStock

    GROWTH IN AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL WORK

    Our largest use of drones has been out in the fields. Two-thirds of the UC system’s drone flights, which encompass thousands of flights and hundreds of flight hours, have been for agricultural and environmental research. This suggests that those areas could provide breakout opportunities for drone uses.

    Some scholars have found many ways drones can replace existing manned aircraft, like with a pesticide-spraying helicopter that could reduce time and costs and provide safer operations. But the biggest factor has been how easy drones make it to collect data that were extremely difficult, or even impossible, to collect before.

    For example, drones with special thermal cameras are allowing researchers to investigate water consumption rates of several varieties of crops in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The drones’ data collection is so detailed that the scholars can count individual melons, allowing much better estimates of crop yield. When farmers know much more precisely how big the harvest will be, they can better estimate how much money they’ll make – and can make better budget decisions with the information.

    Drones are also proving themselves useful in high-resolution aerial coastal survey mapping. In the past, researchers walked along the coast and took pictures to survey areas. This was difficult to do without disturbing wildlife. In addition, surveyors would take pictures from small planes to model and predict coastal erosion and flooding. With drones, they’re able to collect data more frequently with greater detail, and do a better job mapping and analyzing environmental data. That helps improve our understanding of coastal ecology, and prepares local residents and communities for possible disasters because the drones are able to get closer to certain environments which scientists will be able extract more information from.

    For instance, when monitoring giant sequoias, a team of five to seven people would have to map the area, which would take about a week. A drone flight has been able to replace that work with a two-minute flight. That makes it easier to track how the trees are growing and responding to changes in their environment.

    BEYOND THE ACADEMIC REALM

    To meet the demand from people with no experience in drone technology, we have developed special workshops for students, staff, faculty and UC research partners to learn about drone technology, regulations and flight instruction.

    Campus film and media departments regularly use drones to make sweeping images of our scenic campus locations for promotional videos and reports. Beyond that, though, university facilities workers have been using drones to monitor construction sites, inspect building areas that are hard to get to (like roofs) and keep an eye on the university’s sizable landholdings. All of these uses can significantly improve worker safety, productivity and cost savings.

    Students are also using drones recreationally, which has raised safety and privacy concerns on our campuses, just as it has off-campus. With plenty of green spaces, many students want to fly their drones and other model aircraft on campus, even near dorms or other housing. We’ve addressed this need with respectful solutions like helping students form clubs and organizing flying events, either on campus fields reserved for the day, or at off-campus parks. We are also seeing what may be the beginnings of a collegiate Drone Racing League.

    This sort of just-for-fun experimentation can make it challenging to regulate drone flights based on what the drone is doing. But universities are often test locations for new technologies. Our work – both formal and recreational – encourages creativity and can foster an entrepreneurial spirit. We can expect that at least some of these early uses for drones will eventually spill into the commercial and consumer markets.

     Read more articles from The Conversation

    {

    11-02-2017 om 01:34 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Japan Has Created Black Mirror-Inspired Bee Drones
    Japan Has Created Black Mirror-Inspired Bee Drones
     
    DRAPER
    IN BRIEF
    • Researchers in Japan have created insect-sized drones capable of artificial pollination, thanks to the help of horse hair and an ionic sticky gel.
    • As bees enter the endangered species list in the United States, these natural pollinators will need all the help they can get.

    ACCIDENTALLY REDISCOVERED

    black-mirror-netflix
    Be careful what you tweet. Credit: Netflix

    In the final episode of Netflix’s Black Mirror, the government claims to be using Autonomous Drone Insects to counteract the collapse of the bee population. Spoiler alert: they’re lying.

    It’s soon discovered that these bee drones are actually being used for mass public surveillance. Worse, the drones are programmed to kill. The deaths are linked to a website promoting a ‘Game of Consequence’ where Twitter users can vote to kill one hated public figure using the hashtag ‘#DeathTo.’

    Now, similar drones are coming to Japan, without all the government secrets and Twitter deaths (we assume). Japan’s insect-sized drones were turned into artificial pollinators with the help of a coating of horse hair and an ionic sticky gel. The drones work like bees and use their hairs to pick up pollen from one flower and deposit it into another.

    Researchers from Japan actually discovered this ionic gel accidentally, and then published their work in the journal Chem. Back in 2007, one of the researchers, chemist Eijiro Miyako, was working on possible liquid electrical conductors. One attempt to do so produced a wax-like sticky gel. The gel was shelved after Miyako considered it a failure. It was rediscovered after a decade during a lab cleanup and, to Miyako’s surprise, the gel remained unchanged.

    “This project is the result of serendipity,” Miyako said. “We were surprised that after 8 years, the ionic gel didn’t degrade and was still so viscous. Conventional gels are mainly made of water and can’t be used for a long time, so we decided to use this material for research.”

    Miyako tested the pollen-grasping abilities of the gel by coating ants with it, which he then left to roam free in a box of tulips. Researchers observed that ants coated with the gel were able to collect more pollen than those that weren’t. In addition, a separate test applying the gel to houseflies revealed that it changes color when exposed to different sources of light — potentially giving it a camouflage effect that can help artificial pollinators avoid predators.

    Image credits: Eijiro Miyako
    Image credits: Eijiro Miyako

    DRONES HELPING NATURE

    With the gel tested and proven to be sticky enough, the next thing to do was to look for the artificial pollinator. Miyako found a $100-four propeller drone and gave it a fuzzy, bee-like exterior. It was the team’s AIST colleagues Masayoshi Tange and Yue Yu who decided to use horse hair on the drone’s surface. These bristles gave more surface area for pollen to attach to, and at the same time, provided electric charge that kept the pollens in place.

    The drones were tested on Japanese lilies, with the team flying them by remote control. The drones would pick up pollen from one flower, and then flew to another flower to deposit the pollen.

    “The findings, which will have applications for agriculture and robotics, among others, could lead to the development of artificial pollinators and help counter the problems caused by declining honeybee populations,” Miyako said. “We believe that robotic pollinators could be trained to learn pollination paths using global positioning systems and artificial intelligence.”

    As bees enter the endangered species list in the United States, these natural pollinators will need all the help they can get. Artificial pollinators can lessen the burden of modern agricultural demand, giving the bees breathing space to recover their numbers. Hopefully, these drones won’t turn out to the way their Black Mirror counterparts did, but we can worry about that later. For now, getting these drones out there to see just how much they could help will keep the world pollinated.

    11-02-2017 om 01:22 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    06-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.RoboDragonfly: Tiny Backpack Turns Insect into a Cyborg

    RoboDragonfly: Tiny Backpack Turns Insect into a Cyborg

    RoboDragonfly: Tiny Backpack Turns Insect into a Cyborg
    A first generation version of the backpack guidance system that includes energy harvesting, navigation and optical stimulation on a to-scale model of a dragonfly.
    Credit: Charles Stark Draper Laboratory

    Scientists look to flying animals — birds, bats and insects — for inspiration when they design airborne drones. But researchers are also investigating how to use technology to interact with, and even guide, animals as they fly, enhancing the unique adaptations that allow them to take to the air.

    To that end, engineers have fitted dragonflies with tiny, backpack-mounted controllers that issue commands directly to the neurons controlling the insects' flight.

    This project, known as DragonflEye, uses optogenetics, a technique that employs light to transmit signals to neurons. And researchers have genetically modified dragonfly neurons to make them more light-sensitive, and thereby easier to control through measured light pulses. [7 Animals That Wore Backpacks for Science.

    Dragonflies have large heads, long bodies and two pairs of wings that don't always flap in sync, according to a 2007 study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. The study authors found that dragonflies maximize their lift when they flap both sets of wings together, and they hover by flapping their wing pairs out of synch, though at the same rate.

    Meanwhile, separate muscles controlling each of their four wings allow dragonflies to dart, hover and turn on a dime with exceptional precision, scientists found in 2014. Researchers used high-speed video footage to track dragonfly flight and build computer models to better understand the insects' complex maneuvers, presenting their findings at the 67th Annual Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting, according to a statement released by the American Physical Society in November 2014.

    DragonflEye sees these tiny flight masters as potentially controllable flyers that would be "smaller, lighter and stealthier than anything else that's manmade," Jesse Wheeler, a biomedical engineer at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL) in Massachusetts and principal investigator on the DragonflEye program, said in a statement.

     
    A close-up of the backpack board and components before being folded and fitted to the dragonfly.
    Credit: Charles Stark Draper Laboratory

    The project is a collaboration between the CSDL, which has been developing the backpack that controls the dragonfly, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), where experts are identifying and enhancing "steering" neurons located in the dragonfly's nerve cord, inserting genes that make it more responsive to light.

    "This system pushes the boundaries of energy harvesting, motion sensing, algorithms, miniaturization and optogenetics, all in a system small enough for an insect to wear," Wheeler said.

    Even smaller than the dragonfly backpack are components created by CSDL called optrodes — optical fibers supple enough to wrap around the dragonfly's nerve cord, so that engineers can target only the neurons related to flight, CSDL representatives explained in a statement.

    And in addition to controlling insect flight, the tiny, flexible optrodes could have applications in human medicine, Wheeler added.

    "Someday these same tools could advance medical treatments in humans, resulting in more effective therapies with fewer side effects," Wheeler said. "Our flexible optrode technology provides a new solution to enable miniaturized diagnostics, safely access smaller neural targets and deliver higher precision therapies."

    Original article on Live Science.

    http://www.livescience.com/ }

    06-02-2017 om 14:09 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    04-02-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Disney's New Robot Means Big Things for Science and Medicine, Can Also Give You a Hug
    Disney does science, too.

    Disney's New Robot Means Big Things for Science and Medicine, Can Also Give You a Hug

    The robot's arms are sensitive and responsive to its surroundings, like a human's are.

    Kastalia Medrano

    Disney Research is about to reinvent the hug. In a new publication titled “A Hybrid Hydrostatic Transmission and Human-Safe Haptic Telepresence Robot,”a team of four authors announced the development of a robot that has joints and can mimic human movement, even manipulating objects with an impressive degree of finesse. It can either work autonomously or be remotely operated by someone who can see everything through the robot’s “eyes.”

    The project took about two years to build, according to John Peter Whitney, an Assistant Professor at Northeastern’s University’s Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and one of the publication’s authors.

    Whitney is currently working with a collaborator at Stanford University to explore the practical implications. One major usage could be needle biopsies, wherein a needle is inserted into a specific location to take a tissue sample. Normally, this necessitates a clinician putting a patient in an MRI machine, scanning, taking them out, inserting the needle, putting the patient back in to scan again, and so forth. This new technology could provide the clinician with the ability to insert the needle while they’re viewing the live imaging. They’d even be able to feel the needle going in. The robotic arms could also be used in “glove box”-type applications, handling radioactive or other hazardous materials.

    “If you want to build robots that interact closely with humans, [it helps to] be able to make the arms very light. In the same way that a humans have proprioception,” Whitney says. “Humans muscles have senses that inform the brain where its arms are … this [robot] can directly feel the environment in the same way. So all the fine interactions between hand and environment are well-preserved, and that allows you to perform more delicate operations, or just move faster with an equivalent level of safety.”

    Whitney says that today’s robots are programmed to go from A to B and/or to stop if something gets in the way. What this new tech from Disney Research looks to do is provide more sensitivity and nuisance to robotic motion, meaning machines won’t have to choose between either aborting mission or smashing something (or someone) into pieces.

    Disney's robot, threading a needle.
    Disney's robot, threading a needle.

    We might not be too far removed from a future where apps supplement much of the work therapists doRobots and high-tech, lifelike dolls are becoming increasingly popular companions, replacing humans for those who prefer their company a little less carbon-based. And don’t forget the brief trend of businesses/safe spaces marketing just cuddles or nap-buddies. So with all that in mind — could Disney’s new robot be commissioned to give out nice, warm hugs?

    “Of course,” Whitney said. “Of course … either [autonomously] or with a direct human operator, it’s reasonable to consider both forms of operation.”

    Aww.

    Photos via YouTube / DisneyResearchHub, YouTube / DisneyResearchHub

    https://www.inverse.com/ }

    04-02-2017 om 21:17 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Researchers Develop a Remarkable Flying

    Researchers Develop a Remarkable Flying "Bat Bot"

    "It's like the holy grail of aerial robotics."

    Cassie Kelly

    bat-like robot may soon be the superhero we’ve been waiting for.

    Inspired, a team of engineers from the California Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois developed technology that mimics the bat for their “Bat Bot.” Their work was published Tuesday in the journal Science Robotics this week about the exciting new innovation in aerial technology. Bat Bot has skin-like silicone wings, carbon-fiber “bones,” and 3D-printed joints, which all give it the ability to glide through the air with precision.

    The bat’s evolutionary complexities make it an awesome flying machine: With more than 40 joints and 200 bones in its tiny frame, the nocturnal mammal is both agile and wickedly fast, with some species achieving speeds of up to 60 miles per hour.

    “When I see a bat flying upside down with such elegant wing movement, I get mesmerized,” Soon-Jo Chung, co-author of the research, told reporters this week in a teleconference. “It’s like the holy grail of aerial robotics.”

    A GIF of Bat Bot shows its range of motion.
    A GIF of Bat Bot shows its range of motion. 

    Previous prototypes of this intricate skeleton incorporated every aspect of the bat, which resulted in a bulky and dense structure that could hardly get off the ground, but Bat Bot uses only the most critical components of a bat’s biology for flight. The new structure, combined with very light materials, makes for a robot that weighs in at just 93 grams (a fifth of a pound).

    “It’s impractical, or impossible, to include all 40 joints in the robot design,” said Chung. “Hence, we have systematically identified nine joint movements, five of which are actively controlled. Those active joints are mainly synchronized for flapping motions and independent left and right wing folding motions for controlling direction and up-and-down movements.”

    As Chung explains, the wings move independently. The tail has two sides that move asymmetrically and it’s able to fill its wings with air to rise, and expel the air to descend, a process called “dynamic soaring.” It can perform sophisticated moves like diving, cutting at sharp angles, and twisting upside down. The researchers are even programming it to hang upside down like an actual bat.

    The Bat Bot was inspired by the Egyptian Fruit Bat.
    The Bat Bot was inspired by the Egyptian Fruit Bat.

    Autonomy

    It’s also autonomous — sort of. It is programmed to “learn” to control and regulate its flying and to sense obstacles in its path. It’s been tedious for the researchers, as even the slightest error can send Bat Bot plunging.

    It’s different from drone technology in that it doesn’t use propellers, making it safer for situations when it has to work near humans. The bot has a small motor, but it is more energy-efficient because it doesn’t rely as heavily on it and uses the wind to push itself in any direction. It will also fly in very tight spots, making it ideal for disaster relief and construction sites.

    So, will “B2” — its nickname — ever be able to control its own direction while in-flight?

    “That’s a different level of autonomy to think about in the future,” Chung tells Inverse.

    Possible Uses for Bat Bot

    “You can imagine a robotic, flapping-wing system operating in tight quarters shared with human first responders and in places where humans cannot go,” says Seth Hutchinson, a study’s co-author. “An aerial robot equipped with radiation detectors, 3D cameras, and temperature and humidity sensors could be used for situations like one created by the Fukushima disaster, where ground robots cannot work effectively and you don’t want humans to be involved.”

    The robot will also be able to move between floors to find survivors, deliver medicine, and even assess buildings for faults in structural integrity.

    Though, with all of this wonderful innovation comes a trade-off. The more complex the technology, the more challenging the repair.

    “As you increase the complexity of the vehicle or robot, you also increase the complexity of a lot of problems you have to solve,” said Hutchinson. “You gain a lot of performance abilities but you pay by having to work harder as an engineer.”

    Some of those problems have been the battery in the motor, which only lasts about six minutes (though its ability to harness the wind affords it more time) and the inherent instability of the bot, being that it is so flimsy.

    The researchers still have a lot of kinks to work out before the Bat Bot’s technology can be used by commercial drones, but they expect it to be marketable within a couple of years. In the meantime, those noisy hovering drones will just have to do.

    Bat Bot is only the latest story of researchers looking to the animal kingdom for inspiration. The Salto jumping robot — a lightweight robot that can jump several feet in the air — was revealed in December, also by researchers from University of California, Berkeley. They were inspired by the galago: a nocturnal African primate nicknamed the “bush baby.”

    Photos via Ramezani/Chung/Hutchinson, Flickr / JoyVanBuhler / Ramezani / Chung / Hutchinson, Flickr / Dasha Gaian

    https://www.inverse.com/ }

    04-02-2017 om 20:59 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    31-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Robots Eliminate Menial Work, Humans Reassigned to More Productive Work

    Robots Eliminate Menial Work, Humans Reassigned to More Productive Work

    By:  

    Robot Training


    Robot Training

    (Image Courtesy Wikipedia: https://goo.gl/images/nrN7Nz)

    According to reports, automation replaced 17,000 “roles” in back office processing at Accenture, a professional services and tech firm over the past year and a half. Thankfully, in this case, no jobs were lost. According to Accenture, automation eliminated menial work, allowing the company’s workforce to do more productive work on behalf of the company.

    Robots & Automation Penetrating Businesses Everywhere

    A team from PolyU in Hong Kong studied the design of precision tools created for space exploration, and with these insights created a new motorized, minimally invasive robotic system for single incision surgery. In India, at the World Laparoscopy Hospital in Gurgaon, more than 1,500 robotic surgeries have taken place over the past six years.

    Tech campuses around the world, such as Texas A&M, are leading the development and commercialization of robotics across a wide range of industries. Robotics is so popular today that training is occurring in elementary, middle, and high schools, and in community centers such as East Palo Alto, where disadvantaged youth participate in competitions.

    Robotics & Automation to Change Employment Forever

    This thirst and interest for robotics is occurring around the world. Countries including China and India have found that importing developing advanced technologies is expensive and it’s better to have a homegrown robotics industry. At the recent World Economic Forum that just wrapped up in Cologny, Switzerland, Manpower Group, one of the world’s largest employment agencies with 400,000 clients in 80 countries, presented a report explaining how the technological revolution, especially robotics, is going to change employment forever.

    Following is a video from Manpower Group: “Learnability: The only way to stay relevant in the future workplace.”

    David Russell Schilling

    David enjoys research and writing about cutting edge technologies that hold the promise of improving conditions for all life on planet earth.

    http://www.industrytap.com/ }

    31-01-2017 om 23:48 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Robots Eliminate Menial Work, Humans Reassigned to More Productive Work

    Robots Eliminate Menial Work, Humans Reassigned to More Productive Work

    By:  

    Robot Training


    Robot Training

    (Image Courtesy Wikipedia: https://goo.gl/images/nrN7Nz)

    According to reports, automation replaced 17,000 “roles” in back office processing at Accenture, a professional services and tech firm over the past year and a half. Thankfully, in this case, no jobs were lost. According to Accenture, automation eliminated menial work, allowing the company’s workforce to do more productive work on behalf of the company.

    Robots & Automation Penetrating Businesses Everywhere

    A team from PolyU in Hong Kong studied the design of precision tools created for space exploration, and with these insights created a new motorized, minimally invasive robotic system for single incision surgery. In India, at the World Laparoscopy Hospital in Gurgaon, more than 1,500 robotic surgeries have taken place over the past six years.

    Tech campuses around the world, such as Texas A&M, are leading the development and commercialization of robotics across a wide range of industries. Robotics is so popular today that training is occurring in elementary, middle, and high schools, and in community centers such as East Palo Alto, where disadvantaged youth participate in competitions.

    Robotics & Automation to Change Employment Forever

    This thirst and interest for robotics is occurring around the world. Countries including China and India have found that importing developing advanced technologies is expensive and it’s better to have a homegrown robotics industry. At the recent World Economic Forum that just wrapped up in Cologny, Switzerland, Manpower Group, one of the world’s largest employment agencies with 400,000 clients in 80 countries, presented a report explaining how the technological revolution, especially robotics, is going to change employment forever.

    Following is a video from Manpower Group: “Learnability: The only way to stay relevant in the future workplace.”

    David Russell Schilling

    David enjoys research and writing about cutting edge technologies that hold the promise of improving conditions for all life on planet earth.

    http://www.industrytap.com/ }

    31-01-2017 om 23:48 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    30-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen."Holy Grail" Metallic Hydrogen Is Going to Change Everything
    Rendering of metallic hydrogen pressurized between diamonds.

    "Holy Grail" Metallic Hydrogen Is Going to Change Everything

    The substance has the potential to revolutionize everything from space travel to the energy grid.

    Kastalia Medrano

    Two Harvard scientists have succeeded in creating an entirely new substance long believed to be the “holy grail” of physics — metallic hydrogen, a material of unparalleled power that could one day propel humans into deep space. The research was published Thursday in the journal Science.

    Scientists created the metallic hydrogen by pressurizing a hydrogen sample to more pounds per square inch than exists at the center of the Earth. This broke the molecule down from its solid state and allowed the particles to dissociate into atomic hydrogen.

    The best rocket fuel we currently have is liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, burned for propellant. The efficacy of such substances is characterized by “specific impulse,” the measure of impulse fuel can give a rocket to propel it forward.

    “People at NASA or the Air Force have told me that if they could get an increase from 450 seconds [of specific impulse] to 500 seconds, that would have a huge impact on rocketry,” Isaac Silvera, the Thomas D. Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard University, told Inverse by phone. “If you can trigger metallic hydrogen to recover to the molecular phase, [the energy release] calculated for that is 1700 seconds.”

    Metallic hydrogen could potentially enable rockets to get into orbit in a single stage, even allowing humans to explore the outer planets. Metallic hydrogen is predicted to be “metastable” — meaning if you make it at a very high pressure then release it, it’ll stay at that pressure. A diamond, for example, is a metastable form of graphite. If you take graphite, pressurize it, then heat it, it becomes a diamond; if you take the pressure off, it’s still a diamond. But if you heat it again, it will revert back to graphite.

    Scientists first theorized atomic metallic hydrogen a century ago. Silvera, who created the substance along with post-doctoral fellow Ranga Dias, has been chasing it since 1982 and working as a professor of physics at the University of Amsterdam.

    Metallic hydrogen has also been predicted to be a high- or possibly room-temperature superconductor. There are no other known room-temperature superconductors in existence, meaning the applications are immense — particularly for the electric grid, which suffers for energy lost through heat dissipation. It could also facilitate magnetic levitation for futuristic high-speed trains; substantially improve performance of electric cars; and revolutionize the way energy is produced and stored.

    But that’s all still likely a couple of decades off. The next step in terms of practical application is to determine if metallic hydrogen is indeed metastable. Right now Silvera has a very small quantity. If the substance does turn out to be metastable, it might be used to create room-temperature crystal and — by spraying atomic hydrogen onto the surface —use it like a seed to grow more, the way synthetic diamonds are made.

    Photos via Nature

    https://www.inverse.com/ }

    30-01-2017 om 20:59 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    28-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Is er metaalwaterstof gemaakt? Wellicht!

    28-01-2017 om 23:19 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Hydrogen turned into metal in stunning act of alchemy that could revolutionise technology and spaceflight

    Hydrogen turned into metal in stunning act of alchemy that could revolutionise technology and spaceflight

    ‘It’s the first-ever sample of metallic hydrogen on Earth, so when you’re looking at it, you’re looking at something that’s never existed before’

    Ian Johnston Science Correspondent

    Scientists at Harvard University succeeded in creating a tiny amount of the rarest, and possibly most valuable, material on the planet

    For nearly 100 years, scientists have dreamed of turning the lightest of all the elements, hydrogen, into a metal.

    Now, in a stunning act of modern-day alchemy, scientists at Harvard University have finally succeeded in creating a tiny amount of what is the rarest, and possibly most valuable, material on the planet, they reported in the journal Science.

    Update: Physicists might have made a mistake in claiming to have turned hydrogen into a metal, experts say

    For metallic hydrogen could theoretically revolutionise technology, enabling the creation of super-fast computers, high-speed levitating trains and ultra-efficient vehicles and dramatically improving almost anything involving electricity.

    And it could also allow humanity to explore outer space as never before.

    But the prospect of this bright future could be at risk if the scientists’ next step – to establish whether the metal is stable at normal pressures and temperatures – fails to go as hoped.

    Professor Isaac Silvera, who made the breakthrough with Dr Ranga Dias, said: “This is the holy grail of high-pressure physics.

    “It's the first-ever sample of metallic hydrogen on Earth, so when you're looking at it, you're looking at something that’s never existed before.”

    At the moment the tiny piece of metal can only be seen through two diamonds that were used to crush liquid hydrogen at a temperature far below freezing. 

    The amount of pressure needed was immense – more than is found at the centre of the Earth.

    The sample has remained trapped in this astonishing grip, but sometime in the next few weeks, the researchers plan to carefully ease the pressure.

    According to one theory, metallic hydrogen will be stable at room temperature – a prediction that Professor Silvera said was “very important”.

    “That means if you take the pressure off, it will stay metallic, similar to the way diamonds form from graphite under intense heat and pressure, but remains a diamond when that pressure and heat is removed,” he said.

    If this is true, then its properties as a super-conductor could dramatically improve anything that uses electricity.

    “As much as 15 per cent of energy is lost to dissipation during transmission, so if you could make wires from this material and use them in the electrical grid, it could change that story,” the scientist said.

    And metallic hydrogen could also transform humanity’s efforts to explore our solar system by providing a form of rocket fuel nearly four times more powerful than the best available today.

    “It takes a tremendous amount of energy to make metallic hydrogen,” Professor Silvera said. 

    “And if you convert it back to molecular hydrogen, all that energy is released, so it would make it the most powerful rocket propellant known to man, and could revolutionize rocketry.

    “That would easily allow you to explore the outer planets. 

    “We would be able to put rockets into orbit with only one stage, versus two, and could send up larger payloads, so it could be very important.”

    However some scientists have theorised that metallic hydrogen will be unstable on its surface and so would gradually decay.

    Asked what he thought would happen, Professor Silvera said: “I don’t want to guess, I want to do the experiment.”

    But it could be a moment almost as exciting as the time the researchers first realised what they had created.

    “Ranga was running the experiment, and we thought we might get there, but when he called me and said, ‘The sample is shining’, I went running down there, and it was metallic hydrogen.

    “I immediately said we have to make the measurements to confirm it, so we rearranged the lab ... and that's what we did.

    “It's a tremendous achievement, and even if it only exists in this diamond anvil cell at high pressure, it's a very fundamental and transformative discovery.”

    More about: 

    http://www.independent.co.uk/ }

    28-01-2017 om 23:10 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    27-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Soon printing a human heart on demand will no longer be sci-fi

    Soon printing a human heart on demand will no longer be sci-fi

    hearth condition tests
    Sebastian Kaulitzk | Getty Images

    Imagine being able to grow a liver in a laboratory from cells and tissue for a transplant patient. Or engineering cells to grow into a heart valve to replace one damaged from heart disease. Around the world, start-ups — like Tokyo-based Cyfuse Biomedical — are emerging to develop such breakthroughs in the field of regenerative medicine. It is a market projected to reach $101.3 billion by 2022.

    Unlike conventional medicines and treatments, regenerative medicines have the ability to restore or heal the body's own cells or create new body parts from a patient's own cells and tissues, thereby eliminating tissue rejection and the excessively long wait for a donor organ.

    This would be a remarkable scientific achievement, considering that in the United States, 118,950 people are registered in the Organ Procurement Transplantation Network. Of these candidates, 22 die each day waiting for a lifesaving organ. The gap between supply and demand continues to widen, and it's a problem many medical experts have called a major health crisis.

    Breakthroughs in bioprinting

    It may sound like science fiction, but already scientists at Cyfuse have bioprinted blood vessels able to withstand 10 times the pressure of those already in the human body, according to Koji Kuchiishi, co-founder and former CEO.

    Bioprinting works like this: Scientists harvest human cells from biopsies or stem cells, then allow them to multiply in a petri dish. The resulting mixture, a sort of biological ink, is fed into a 3-D printer that is programmed to arrange different cell types and materials into a three-dimensional shape. Doctors hope that when placed into the body, these 3-D printed cells will integrate with existing tissue.

    While breakthroughs in central nervous system and cardiac treatments remain in the future for now, Cyfuse's Regenova bioprinter is attracting attention from the scientific community. The bioprinter is a robotic system that facilitates the fabrication of 3-D cellular structures by placing cellular spheroids in fine needle arrays according to predesigned 3-D data. Among Cyfuse's goals: to treat spinal injuries and heart failure.

    This year the company transplanted human neural tissue into the brain of a small animal with positive results. Blood vessels migrated into the transplanted tissue and the graft was healing after a month.

    Cyfuse has also started a clinical trial of a cartilage project, transplanting its stem cell construct into damaged articular cartilage that will gradually differentiate into cartilage and bone and regenerate the tissue.

    Cyfuse is one of a growing number of tech start-ups trying to get a toehold in the global marketplace. The sector is blossoming due to innovations in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering. North America accounted for nearly 50 percent of revenue share of global market revenues for regenerative medicines in 2016. Europe is second, at US$24 billion, with Germany leading the region.

    Japan and South Korea are steadily gaining ground, however. Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry forecasts the regenerative medicine market to grow to 1 trillion yen ($9.6 billion) domestically by 2030.

    With technological adoption and emphasis on research of these medicines, Asia-Pacific is currently one of the fastest-growing regions for regenerative medicine.

    The medical power of Japanese art

    While there are several companies around the globe leading the 3-D bioprinting space — including Organovo in San Diego, Aspect Biosystems in Vancouver, 3D Bioprinting Solutions in Russia and Rokit in South Korea — Cyfuse says its Kenzan method, a proprietary technique developed by Cyfuse co-founder and human tissue engineer, Koichi Nakayama, differentiates it from the pack. 

    Named after the spikes used to secure flowers in place in the Japanese art of Ikebana, Kenzan relies on the cultivation of cell aggregates into spheroids that are skewered on stainless-steel spines in the bioprinter.

    Regenova is also scaffold-free, meaning the printer fabricates tissue without needing to add any extraneous matter that might pollute it. And unlike many of the other bioprinters, there is no need for collagen or hydrogels; the cells produce their own extracellular matrix.

    "To unlock the potential [of bioprinting], it's going to take the marriage between the machine and the imagination of scientists."
    -Dr. David Yu, vice president of business development at Cell Applications

    In February 2016, San Diego-based Cell Applications became the first U.S. company to use Regenova. In the same month, Virginia-based Lifenet, an institution specializing in regenerative medicine and transplants, became the first buyer anywhere in the world to purchase the system.

    "I did a market assessment and review and reached out to a number of companies, including Cyfuse," said Cell Applications' vice president of sales and marketing Daniel Schroen, Ph.D. "Some of them were pretty far upstream from commercialization."

    The Californian company is using the bioprinter to create 3-D tissue for a range of clients spanning academic and corporate research.

    "We've printed small, tiny beating heart tissue here. We've also printed blood vessels," explained Dr. Schroen.

    Medical schools are finding uses for the bioprinter as well. Pediatric cardiac surgeon Narutoshi Hibino of Johns Hopkins is using Regenova to develop bioprinted heart patches to patch the damaged hearts of patients with heart failure who are unable to cope with medication or receive complex cardiac surgery.

    At the Indiana University School of Medicine, Dr. Lester Smith, assistant research professor of radiology and imaging sciences and manager of the school's 3D Bioprinting Core, is engaged in clinical biofabricating projects aimed at repairing bone and tendon damage and nipple tissue generation, as well as liver, pancreatic and breast cancer models for metabolic activity and drug-response analysis. 

    "The bioprinter holds promise to more naturally reproduce tissues in the body than other current bioprinting methods," said Dr. Smith. 

    More from Modern Medicine:
    These new tech devices are the new painkillers
    How to prepare for the next epidemic
    Why America is losing the battle against its No. 1 killer disease

    Now, with a staff of 23, the company has eight 3-D printer systems operating at Japanese universities and five in U.S. institutions and companies.

    While Cyfuse's prospects seem bright, just how quickly futuristic ideas resembling science-fiction fantasy can be realized is unknown. 

    "This system has a lot of potential because it is unique in many ways," said Dr. David Yu, vice president of business development at Cell Applications. "To unlock that potential, it's going to take the marriage between the machine and the imagination of scientists.

    By Julian Littler, special to CNBC.com

    http://www.cnbc.com/ }

    27-01-2017 om 00:17 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    26-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Scientists Create the Highest Quality Hologram Device Ever Made

    Scientists Create the Highest Quality Hologram Device Ever Made

     
    Lei Wang, ANU
    IN BRIEF
    • A researchers from Australian National University were able to develop a hologram device that gives the highest quality images to date.
    • According to the study, the compact device is made up of millions of tiny silicon pillars, which are up to 500 times thinner than human hair.

    HIGH QUALITY

    Holograms are a staple of almost every science fiction movie or TV show out there – from Star Wars to Star Trek. Now, thanks to researchers from the Australian National University (ANU), we may be a step closer to achieving just that — and sending messages to Obi Wan Kenobi.

    The ANU team was able to develop a hologram device that gives the highest quality images to date. “As a child, I learned about the concept of holographic imaging from the Star Wars movies. It’s really cool to be working on an invention that uses the principles of holography depicted in those movies,” said lead researcher Lei Want, from ANU’s Research School of Physics and Engineering. The team published their research in the journal Optica.

    Wang’s device is able to create high-quality hologram images in infrared, using “transparent metaholograms based on silicon metasurfaces that allow high-resolution grayscale images to be encoded,” according to the study. The device is also quite small. It’s made up of millions of tiny silicon pillars, which are up to 500 times thinner than human hair.

    “This new material is transparent, which means it loses minimal energy from the light, and it also does complex manipulations with light,” said co-researcher Sergey Kruk. “Our ability to structure materials at the nanoscale allows the device to achieve new optical properties that go beyond the properties of natural materials. The holograms that we made demonstrate the strong potential of this technology to be used in a range of applications.”

    DEFINING HOLOGRAPHIC IMAGES

    The real-life applications of such a hologram device aren’t too far from the sci-fi counterparts. “While research in holography plays an important role in the development of futuristic displays and augmented reality devices, today we are working on many other applications such as ultra-thin and light-weight optical devices for cameras and satellites,” Wang said.

    Furthermore, because of its size, this device is very portable. This significantly reduces the size and weight of the usually bulky components used in other imaging devices. This can cut the cost for space missions, for example, where heavier loads translate to higher rocket fuel consumption. Apart from these, holograms can also be used to aid medical research and develop treatments for various diseases.

    Holography isn’t very different from what augmented or virtual reality (AR/VR) technology is enabling us to do. Essentially, this technology allows us to see and interact with our environment in a much deeper way, so to speak. This tech can even let us see something as if we were really there, in the moment, with added empathy. This could change the way we enjoy news, documentaries, or even live events from afar. Soon, we may be able to send messages that capture emotion or urgency much better than a phone call ever could.

    26-01-2017 om 21:21 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    24-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Scientists May Have Discovered What Allowed Life to Evolve

    Scientists May Have Discovered What Allowed Life to Evolve

    IN BRIEF
    • Researchers have discovered that chemically active droplets grow to a set size and then divide on their own accord in a way that's very similar to living cell division.
    • The discovery could help us understand how the very first living cells initially evolved from protocells billions of years ago, though much more research is still ahead of us.

    THE ORIGIN OF LIFE

    Modern science has advanced significantly over the last couple of decades. We’ve managed to answer several of the world’s most long-standing questions, but some answers have continued to elude today’s scientists, including how life first emerged from the Earth’s primordial soup. However, a collaboration of physicists and biologists in Germany may have just found an explanation to how living cells first evolved.

    In 1924, Russian biochemist Alexander Oparin proposed the idea that the first living cells could have evolved from liquid droplet protocells. He believed these protocells could have acted as naturally forming, membrane-free containers that concentrated chemicals and fostered reactions.

    In their hunt for the origin of life, a team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, both in Dresden, drew from Oparin’s theory by studying the physics of “chemically active” droplets (droplets that cycle molecules from the fluid in which they are surrounded). Unlike a “passive” type of droplet, like oil in water, which will just continue to grow as more oil is added to the mix, the researchers realized that chemically active droplets grow to a set size and then divide on their own accord.

    This behavior mimics the division of living cells and could therefore be the link between the nonliving primordial liquid soup from which life sprung and the living cells that eventually evolved to create all life on Earth. “It makes it more plausible that there could have been spontaneous emergence of life from nonliving soup,” said Frank Jülicher, co-author of the study that appeared in the journal Nature Physics in December 2016. It’s an explanation of “how cells made daughters,” said lead researcher David Zwicker. “This is, of course, key if you want to think about evolution.

    ADD A DROPLET OF LIFE

    Some have speculated that these protocellular droplets might still be inside our system “like flies in life’s evolving amber.” To explore that theory, the team studied the physics of centrosomes, which are organelles active in animal cell division that seem to behave like droplets. Zwicker modeled an “out-of-equilibrium” centrosome system that was chemically active and cycling constituent proteins continuously in and out of the surrounding liquid cytoplasm. The proteins behave as either soluble (state A) or insoluble (state B).  An energy source can trigger a state reversal, causing the protein in state A to transform into state B by overcoming a chemical barrier. As long as there was an energy source, this chemical reaction could happen. “In the context of early Earth, sunlight would be the driving force,” Jülicher said.

    Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine
    Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine

    Odarin famously believed that lighting strikes or geothermal activity on early Earth could’ve triggered these chemical reactions from the liquid protocells. This constant chemical influx and efflux would only counterbalance itself, according to Zwicker, when a certain volume was reached by the active droplet, which would then stop growing. Typically, the droplets could grow to about tens or hundreds of microns, according to Zwicker’s simulations. That’s about the same scale as cells.

    The next step is to identify when these protocells developed the ability to transfer genetic information. Jülicher and his colleagues believe that somewhere along the way, the cells developed membranes, perhaps from the crusts they naturally develop out of lipids that prefer to remain at the intersection of the droplet and outside liquid. As a kind of protection for what’s within the cells, genes could’ve begun coding for these membranes. But knowing anything for sure still depends on more experiments.

    So, if the very complex life on Earth could have begun from something as seemingly inconspicuous as liquid droplets, perhaps the same could be said of possible extraterrestrial life? In any case, this research could help us understand how life as we know it started from the simplest material and how the chemical processes that made our lives possible emerged from these. The energy and time it took for a protocell to develop into a living cell, and the living cells into more complex parts, until finally developing into an even more complex organism is baffling. The process itself took billions of years to happen, so it’s not surprising we need some significant time to fully understand it.

    https://futurism.com/ }

    24-01-2017 om 23:57 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Scientists Have Created Heat-Sensing “Skin” for Robots

    Scientists Have Created Heat-Sensing “Skin” for Robots

    IN BRIEF
    • This transparent film can detect a warm body the size of a teddy bear from a meter away and is twice as sensitive as human skin at sensing temperature changes.
    • Because it is made of low-cost pectin, the material could prove very useful in creating heat-sensitive humanoid robots that could navigate crowds or assist in search and rescue missions.

    INSPIRED BY NATURE

    Drawing inspiration from nature, scientists have created a heat-sensing film that would allow robots to detect temperature changes in their environment.

    Image Credit: D-MAVT, ETH, CIT

    Developed by the team from ETH Zurich in Switzerland, the material mimics how the natural membrane of a snake works to help the animal identify nearby prey. Surprisingly, the researchers were able to achieve this using pectin — a low-cost substance that’s primarily used to thicken jam.

    To make the film, a pectin solution was mixed with calcium chloride and then dehydrated to create a transparent, flexible material. Unlike traditional electronics, which detect temperature changes via currents of electrons, this film senses temperature variations through ion currents, which is the process used by snakes. Any change in the nearby temperature would affect the film’s resistance, which the researchers could measure via electrodes along the film’s edges.

    To test the film, the team microwaved a teddy bear to 37° C (98.6° F) and measured how it affected the film from various distances. Results showed that the membrane was able to recognize the warmed bear from as far away as one meter. It could also detect temperature changes as small as 10 millikelvin — that’s twice as sensitive as human skin.

    HEAT-SENSING FOR MACHINES AND AI

    “Pectin films are ultra-low cost and scalable, insensitive to pressure and bending, and can be used to augment temperature sensing when integrated in synthetic skin platforms,” the researchers explain in their published study. This could be particularly useful in creating artificially intelligent (AI) robots, as covering a robot’s entire body with this film would essentially give it a layer of “skin” capable of 360-degree thermal sensing.

    “The most important thing about combining AI and humanoid robots is that this AI needs to be shaped by its senses like we are,” research lead Raffaele Di Giacomo told New Scientist. “You need to provide full sensory feedback so the AI can build up a picture of the world.” Indeed, heat-sensing features could help robots learn more about their environment and function more efficiently. For starters, the technology could allow robots to seamlessly navigate crowded areas. It would also make it easier for robots developed for emergency response to locate humans during search and rescue missions.

    Because the film makes it possible to give nearly any object temperature-sensing capabilities, it has applications outside of robotics as well. It could be used in prosthetics to help provide sensory feedback for wearers, and given the film’s flexibility, it could easily be fitted around mechanical parts, too. The team says that it can be applied either as a spray-on or dip-coating — yet another example of the technology featured on the show “Westworld” potentially cropping up in real life.

    24-01-2017 om 23:53 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    16-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.A New Jetpack is About to Take to the Skies

    A New Jetpack is About to Take to the Skies

     
    Jetpack Aviation
    IN BRIEF
    • A jetpack is finally looking for its first civilian test pilot but only the "well qualified" need apply to ensure safety.
    • The pack can take a ride up to 914 meters (3,000 feet) but only for a short period of five to ten minutes.

    Jetpack Aviation CEO David Mayman with the older model JB-9 jetpack

    Jetpack Aviation CEO David Mayman with the older model JB-9 jetpack(Credit: Loz Blain/New Atlas)

    The New Wave of Personal Flight

    In November, we wrote about a jetpack that was being made available to the general public – well, for those who have $250,000 to spare.

    It’s called the JB-10, and it was fabricated by Jetpack Aviation. A month prior, CEO David Mayman successfully flew the jetpack off the coast of Monaco.

    Regarding specs, this jetpack comes packed with twin jet engines and 7 percent more power than it’s former JB-9 model. It can ascend to 305 meters (1,000 ft) per minute and lasts about 5 to 10 minutes per ride.

    “It’s like a Segway,” Mayman described. “If you want to go forward, you just lean forward. If you want to stop, you just lean back. It’s incredibly simple. If you wanted to fly a helicopter, you’d need 150 hours of training — but with this, you can learn everything you need to know in about 3 hours.”

    Ready to buy one? Not just yet. The JB-10 might be available for consumers, but only to “well-qualified buyers.” It’s a company tactic to prevent people from flying recklessly. So they announced a contest to award one lucky person the special opportunity to test fly the JB-10 as Jetpack Aviation’s first civilian guinea pig. This is an incredible occasion, knowing that Mayman is the only one to have flown one as of yet.

    Mayman hopes to include safety training for potential customers as part of the sales process in the near future. If this civilian flight is successful, it will pave the way for a new era of personal flight. Also on his radar is an all-electric jetpack that will be used to train test pilots without the gas-guzzling feature.

    David Mayman flies the JB-10 jetpack

    WANT MORE JETPACK IDEAS? 

    Other options for a good time in the air include BW-Air, a golf cart jetpack that was released by the Martin Aircraft Company. It can rise up to 914 meters (3,000 feet), and can reach speeds of up to 46 mph (74 km/hr). Only hurdles: a mere $200,000 and a permit to ride from authorities.

    Martin Aircraft Company also engaged in another project, partnering with Dubai officials in order to tackle the issue of fighting fires from skyscrapers. These jetpacks accelerate up to speeds of 75 km/hr (46 mph) and can reach up to 914 meters (3,000 feet). That’s slightly taller than the Burj Khalifa

    With all these technological advancements, what will they come up with next? We’re excited to find out.

    jetpack aviation jb

    16-01-2017 om 20:27 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    10-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.Predicting 2017: The Rise of Synthetic Intelligence

    Predicting 2017: The Rise of Synthetic Intelligence

    by Todd Jaquith

     Adobe

    The transition from one year to the next is always a little uncertain – an uneasy blend of anxiety and optimism, it’s also a time of retrospection, introspection, and even a little tentative prognostication. And since the latter is our stock-in-trade at Futurism, we believe now is the perfect time to look ahead at what 2017 has in store for us.

    When it came to artificial intelligence (AI), 2016 was a year of notable firsts: Tesla’s autopilot predicted a car crashAlexa was subpoenaed, the White House took notice of the subject, and Google’s AlphaGo beat the reigning European Go champion. But 2016 is gone and buried and 2017 is promising even greater advances in AI as the technology further infiltrates our lives and colonizes new frontiers of endeavor.

    Here’s some of what we can expect for artificial intelligence in the year ahead.

    Personal AI

    2016 saw the growth of more consumer-oriented AI. Alexa, Siri, and Cortana—among many others—now come standard in our handy personal devices, and Amazon even open-sourced Alexa for developers. Look for 2017 to be the year when AI begins to be a commonplace in some apps, and also expect the other major tech companies to follow Amazon’s lead in opening up their AI systems to outside development.

    With this more collaborative approach to the evolution of AI, we may finally begin to see the personalization of artificial intelligence, and a great proliferation of new AI programs with idiosyncratic personalities, temperaments, and even intellectual outlooks.

    Some of the artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms currently helping machines think. Credit: CIO Journal/Narrative Science
    Some of the artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms currently helping machines think. 
    Credit: CIO Journal/Narrative Science

    A Better Conversationalist

    Trying to hold a conversation with Siri or Alexa is like watching two people in the same canoe paddling in opposite directions—it just ain’t goin’ anywhere. For one thing, neither have much a sense of humor; furthermore, these robotic ladies just lack that wonted je ne sais quoi we expect in our intellectual sparring partners—they’re dull, frankly, and haven’t really got much to say.

    But in 2017, that’s all about to change.

    “In 2017 there will be a chatbot that passes the Turing test, exhibiting responses so human-like that an average person wouldn’t be able to tell if it’s human or machine,” forecasts Jim McHugh, Vice President and General Manager at NVIDIA. Such extraordinary capabilities will be the natural sequel to the new advances in machine learning, natural language processing, and pattern recognition that will finally beget more empathic and intuitive AI programs.

    “In the coming year, we will see advances that are used to endow systems with new human-centered qualities, including more natural, fluid conversation—that can address several topics or needs in one ongoing interaction, and deeper understanding of human values and intentions, such as recognizing the commitments we make to others in our email and text messaging,” observes Eric Horvitz, Technical Fellow and Managing Director at Microsoft Research.

    Very soon now, you’ll really be able to have that deep, meaningful conversation with Alexa that you always wanted.

    Cognitive Machinery

    According to the big brains at Ovum, “machine learning will be the biggest disruptor for big data analytics in 2017.”  They’ve got a point, too—a damn good one. Deep learning and neural networks have shown remarkable promise, even holding out the hope that they might point the way toward achieving some sort of serviceable, human-like machine intelligence—not a terrible surprise, since their mechanism mimics the layered cognitive processing employed by the human brain.

    And in 2017, we can expect even greater strides in machine learning, as massive upgrades to parallel processing power enable the networks to crunch ever-larger blocks of data. “Generative adversarial networks” (GANs) are the next big thing in machine learning—essentially dual networks, one that learns from datasets and another that distinguishes between real and fake data.

    So look for our machines to become better learners in 2017, as AI approaches its “terrible twos” and begins to cognitively mature.

    A Companion Mind

    Harry Shrum, Executive Vice President of Microsoft’s AI and Research Group, is cheerfully optimistic about AI’s outlook in the coming year:

    In 2017 we’ll see increased acceleration in the democratization of AI for every person and every organization. With advances in technology, computers will gain even greater ability to see, hear and understand our world—to make us more productive, to have more fun and also enable greater strides towards solving some of society’s most pressing challenges like fighting disease, ignorance, and poverty.”

    And that seems to be the general consensus about what the New Year holds for artificial intelligence. Not a mystical singularity; not the sudden “awakening” of an inchoate machine mind—inhuman, alien, perhaps even malevolent or at least antipathetic to all we hold dear. That’s a fantasy—the reality will be far more prosaic.

    If AI is taken to mean the evolution of tools that act in concert with their makers, and are instilled with a limited, almost instinctual awareness, then we seem to be well on the way toward building a world in which our machines are active partners in the business of life. So don’t look for the coming of Skynet or HAL 9000 in 2017—nothing so dramatic as all that. For now, baby steps—incremental steps toward a world in which our very tools are endowed with the same sort of sensory and reactive faculties that are found throughout the living world.

    Now, as for 2018… that’s a different story altogether.

    10-01-2017 om 12:35 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)
    07-01-2017
    Klik hier om een link te hebben waarmee u dit artikel later terug kunt lezen.CES Day One: The Weirdest, Coolest, and Most Futuristic Tech

    CES Day One: The Weirdest, Coolest, and Most Futuristic Tech

     
    IN BRIEF
    • Every year, the Consumer Electronics Show highlights the latest in tech, and this year's innovations include paper-thin televisions, autonomous cars, and advanced AI systems.
    • Though not all of the products showcased at the CES will make it to market, the event is an inspiring showcase of humanity's capacity for innovation and imagination.

    It’s the first week in January, and that can only mean two things — painful hangovers from New Year’s revelries and the international Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas!  Forget Christmas…for tech nerds, the CES is like dying and going to heaven — a heaven full of shiny new technology, self-driving cars, flying cars, vibrating pants, robots, smart beds, and loads of other neat stuff.

    There’s a lot of new tech to get through, so let’s take a look at some of the coolest (and weirdest) offerings at the CES 2017:

    NVIDIA’S SPOT AND SHIELD

    Nvidia Shield Spot

    NVIDIA founder and CEO Jen-Hsun Huang was the keynote speaker on Wednesday night, and he revealed some of the company’s big plans for the coming year.  Among the most notable was the “Shield,” a 4K HDR streaming media player, but it’s NVIDIA’s new AI platforms that are really turning heads. NVIDIA’s SPOT device, which can be simply plugged into any outlet and linked with the Shield, is capable of natural language processing and voice recognition, and it even knows where you are in your house. Big Huang is watching you!

    BOSCH CONCEPT CAR

    Bosch’s new concept car gives us a preview of a world in which cars are personalized and, frankly, little more than big, expensive smart devices that can move you from place to place. Bosch’s futuristic vehicle concept includes facial recognition technology to customize the driving experience to an individual driver’s tastes, and the car’s haptic touch display, gesture control, and eye-tracking systems seem awfully “sci-fi” to us.

    Credit: Bosch
    Credit: Bosch

    THE FF91

    Faraday Future, meanwhile, launched its FF91 — a fully electric, fully connected self-driving car with a 1,050-hp engine that can take it from 0 to 60 mph in 2.39 seconds. And it even includes a smartphone-operated “driverless valet” that parks the car for you. Eat your heart out, Tesla!

    DRIVERLESS AI

    In other news, the German automotive company ZF has partnered with NVIDIA to create the ProAI, a deep-learning artificial intelligence (AI) program that represents a huge step toward “intellectualizing” our vehicles. According to an NVIDIA press release, the ZF ProAI “will be able to process inputs from multiple cameras, plus lidar, radar and ultrasonic sensors, in a process we call sensor fusion,” generating a 360-degree sensory sphere for the vehicle.

    Looks like our vehicles are finally getting the futuristic smarts they’ll need to survive in the 21st century.

    WALLPAPER TV

    COMING SOON - LG SIGNATURE OLED TV W - 4K HDR Smart TV - 77" Class (76.7" Diag)

    In the world of television (a perennial favorite), LG debuted the Signature OLED TV W — known on the street as “The Wallpaper TV.”  It’s got a flexible screen with a depth of just 4 millimeters (.15 inches). You can hang it on the wall with magnets, and it comes in 65- and 77-inch versions. It’s slim, sleek, and futuristic, and you can have it in April for the low, low price of only $8,000.

    VIBRATING PANTS

    Easily the most anticipated product at the CES 2017 — and without question 2017’s most promising transformative technology — is Spinali Design’s vibrating short-shorts, which sync with your phone and translate directions from your favorite navigation app into goading twitches to your left or right cheeks. For the time being, however, the technology is limited to women who habitually go braless and have an unhealthy denim fixation.

    Credit: Spinali Design
    Credit: Spinali Design

    Virtual reality shoes

    Cerevo VR shoes

    Developed by Japanese firm Cerevo, the Taclim VR shoes allow you to use your feet to interact with what you see in virtual reality.

    The shoes give haptic feedback and vibrations to the wearer to give them a sense of walking on the virtual surfaces they see in front of them.

    Hypersuit

    Hypersuit

    Another extension to a virtual reality headset, the Hypersuit is a wearable simulator from French firm THEORY that gives the wearer the impression they have wings or can fly like a superhero.

    Intended for entertainment and gaming purposes, users lie on a movable exoskeleton platform and use their arms to control the direction of "flight", while a fan blows in their face to complete the illusion.

    Smart cane

    Created by French company Dring, this smart cane for the elderly is designed to learn the user's habits and detect any unusual activity, such as falling over.

    It can then automatically alert carers and family, without any action from the user, and share their location over text or email.

    Smart bed

    Sleep Number 360 Smart Bed

    The Sleep Number 360 smart bed is designed to keep you comfortable by sensing your movements and automatically adjusting your position to keep you sleeping blissfully.

    It works even when there are two people in the bed, can warm your feet to help you fall asleep faster, and even raise you head to stop snoring.

    We’ll continue to keep you updated on the weird and wonderful technology being showcased at the CES 2017.

    07-01-2017 om 01:22 geschreven door peter

    0 1 2 3 4 5 - Gemiddelde waardering: 0/5 - (0 Stemmen)
    Categorie:SF-snufjes ( E, F en NL )
    >> Reageer (0)



    logo

    http://www.ufo.be/index.php


    Foto

    DES LIENS AVEC LE RESEAU FRANCOPHONE DE MUFON ET MUFONEUROP
  • BELGISCH UFO-NETWERK BUFON
  • RFacebook BUFON
  • MUFONFRANCE
  • MUFON RHÔNE-ALPES
  • MUFON MIDI-PYRÉNNÉES
  • MUFON HAUTE-NORMANDIE
  • MUFON MAROC
  • MUFON ALSACE LORRAINE
  • MUFON USA
  • Site du REUB ASBL

    Other links with friends / bloggers # not always UFOs
  • PANGRadio MarcSima
  • Blog 2 Bernward
  • Nederlandse UFO-groep
  • Ufologie Liège
  • NIBURU
  • Disclose TV
  • UFO- Sightings - HOTSPOT
  • Website van BUFON ( Belgisch UFO-Netwerk)
  • The Ciizen Hearing on Disclosure
  • Exopolitics Finland: LINKS

    LINKS OF THE BLOGS OF MY FACEBOOK-FRIENDS
  • ufologie -Guillaume Perrot
  • UFOMOTION
  • CENTRE DE RECHERCHE OVNI PARASPYCHOLOGIE SCIENCE - CROPS -
  • SOCIAL PARANORMAL Magazine
  • TJ Morris ACO Associations, Clubs, Organizations - TJ Morris ACO Social Service Club for...
  • C.E.R.P.I. BELGIQUE
  • Attaqued'un Autre Monde - Christian Macé
  • UFOSPOTTINGNEDERLAND
  • homepage UFOSPOTTINGNEDERLAND
  • PARANORMAL JOURNEY GUIDE

    WELCOME TO THIS BLOG! I hope that you enjoy the lecture of all issues. If you did see a UFO, you can always mail it to us. Best wishes.
    Beste bezoeker,
    Heb je zelf al ooit een vreemde waarneming gedaan, laat dit dan even weten via email aan
    oliver.d.julian|@gmail.com of aan www.ufo.be. Deze onderzoekers behandelen jouw melding in volledige anonimiteit en met alle respect voor jouw privacy. Ze zijn kritisch, objectief  maar open minded aangelegd en zullen jou steeds een verklaring geven voor jouw waarneming!
    DUS AARZEL NIET, ALS JE EEN ANTWOORD OP JOUW VRAGEN WENST, CONTACTEER OLIVER.
    BIJ VOORBAAT DANK...

    Laatste commentaren
  • vmZZvxbWE9b (D0nDSjBm)
        op Crop Formation Found In Small Farming Community of Victoria, Honduras On Nov 28, 2015, Photos, UFO Sighting News.
  • O9HU8ltvcST (WOxMBGcwaqpa)
        op SETI scientist claims: If Aliens did visit us, they’d take control over everything
  • eFvZENe4G (QNDMgXhpq)
        op Desert Man of the UFOs
  • Dropbox

    Druk op onderstaande knop om je bestand , jouw artikel naar mij te verzenden. INDIEN HET DE MOEITE WAARD IS, PLAATS IK HET OP DE BLOG ONDER DIVERSEN MET JOUW NAAM...


    Gastenboek
  • Nog een fijne avond
  • Hallo Lieverd
  • kiekeboe
  • Een goeie middag bezoekje
  • Zomaar een blogbezoekje

    Druk op onderstaande knop om een berichtje achter te laten in mijn gastenboek Alvast bedankt voor al jouw bezoekjes en jouw reacties. Nog een prettige dag verder!!!


    Foto

    Over mijzelf
    Ik ben Pieter, en gebruik soms ook wel de schuilnaam Peter2011.
    Ik ben een man en woon in Linter (België) en mijn beroep is Ik ben op rust..
    Ik ben geboren op 18/10/1950 en ben nu dus 66 jaar jong.
    Mijn hobby's zijn: Ufologie en andere esoterische onderwerpen.
    Op deze blog vind je onder artikels, werk van mezelf. Mijn dank gaat ook naar André, Ingrid, Oliver, Paul, Vincent, Georges Filer en MUFON voor de bijdragen voor de verschillende categorieën... Veel leesplezier en geef je mening over deze blog.
    Zoeken in blog


    LINKS NAAR BEKENDE UFO-VERENIGINGEN - DEEL 1
  • http://www.ufonieuws.nl/
  • http://www.grenswetenschap.nl/
  • http://www.beamsinvestigations.org.uk/
  • http://www.mufon.com/
  • http://www.ufomeldpunt.be/
  • http://www.ufowijzer.nl/
  • http://www.ufoplaza.nl/
  • http://www.ufowereld.nl/
  • http://www.stantonfriedman.com/
  • http://ufo.start.be/

    LINKS NAAR BEKENDE UFO-VERENIGINGEN - DEEL 2
  • www.ufo.be
  • www.caelestia.be
  • ufo.startpagina.nl.
  • www.wszechocean.blogspot.com.
  • AsocCivil Unifa
  • UFO DISCLOSURE PROJECT

    Startpagina !


    ">


    Een interessant adres?


    Blog tegen de regels? Meld het ons!
    Gratis blog op http://blog.seniorennet.be - SeniorenNet Blogs, eenvoudig, gratis en snel jouw eigen blog!